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 Killer Shrimps

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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Killer Shrimps   Sun Sep 12, 2010 5:41 pm

KILLER SHRIMP

What is it?

A highly invasive non-native species that has spread from the Ponto-Caspian Region of Eastern Europe. As a
voracious predator it kills a range of native species, including young fish, and significantly alters ecosystems. The
first known outbreak of this species was found in Grafham Water on 3 September 2010.
How do you identify it?
➤ Total body length of up to 30 mm (large for a freshwater amphipod).
➤ May appear striped or uniform in coloration pattern.
➤ Mandibles are relatively large.
➤ Behaviour is particularly vicious and destructive.

Dikerogammarus villosus
www.nonnativespecies.org
Invasive Species Alert!
If you find this species, please send a photo and details of the sighting to:
alert_nonnative@ceh.ac.uk
Help stop the spread of this species by:
➤ Inspecting and cleaning boats and kit before and after use.
➤ Inspecting and cleaning launching trailers.
➤ Draining all bilge water from boats before leaving the site.
➤ Disinfecting angling kit before use.
➤ Making sure no lake water is taken away with your kit.
➤ Not transferring bait between water bodies.
© FBA
© Michal Grabowski
What is the urgency?
➤ This is the first known outbreak in Great Britain. It is vital that we try to stop its spread to new locations. It can be
spread inadvertently by people. By following the guidance below you can help to keep it contained.
Relative sizes of Killer Shrimp
(left) and other native shrimp
species, Gammarus spp.

DEFRA Link https://secure.fera.defra.gov.uk/nonnativespecies/alerts/index.cfm?id=3

BBC News http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11246642
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:23 pm

Guys if you are home on Sunday, or have SKY+ please try and catch....

BBC TV: Countryfile, 6.30pm, BBC1, Sunday 10 October 2010


The threat of this Shrimp is real and spreading.
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Oct 09, 2010 1:24 am

Dikerogammarus villosus. Even sounds nasty.
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Oct 09, 2010 9:53 pm

Sounds and is nasty mate Neutral
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Wed Oct 13, 2010 3:32 pm

If you didnt catch it, use this link http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00vdk6k/Countryfile_10_10_2010/

Start at 10:20


From the Angling Trust -
Anglers first to identify Killer Shrimp
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Wed Oct 13, 2010 6:10 pm

Guy's do you mind me lifting this to post elsewhere?
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Wed Oct 13, 2010 6:13 pm

No problem Tom, thanks for checking
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Oct 22, 2010 9:04 pm

Have not been able to find, or have been sent any information on this spreading further.

No complancey though, lets hope..

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PostSubject: Killer shrimps spreading   Tue Nov 30, 2010 11:02 am

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-11870203

From under Bill Rushmer's punt in Teddington to Wales in 1 week Shocked Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:49 pm

ALL ANGLER ALERT! “KILLER SHRIMP” ON THE MOVE

Salmon & Trout Association and the Angling Trust issue guidelines to anglers to help contain spread of invasion

In September, sharp-eyed anglers fishing on Grafham Water, Rutland, found a new species of shrimp. This was identified by the EA as Dikerogammarus villosus, now known as “the killer shrimp”. This invasive and aggressive species from Eastern Europe kills a range of native species, including young fish, and significantly alters ecosystems.

It has now spread to two sites in Wales (at British Steel’s Margam reservoir near Port Talbot and also in Cardiff Bay) and there is huge concern from anglers and conservationists, as it has the capacity to devastate fish and invertebrates throughout the entire country’s rivers, lakes, reservoirs and canals if not vigorously contained and destroyed.

The Salmon & Trout Association (S&TA) and the Angling Trust (AT), along with other bodies, are issuing a “high alert” to all anglers and anyone else coming into contact with waterbodies. The organisations recommend that all water users follow these simple safety procedures:

• Always be on the alert and familiarise yourself with the shrimp’s appearance (see Environment Agency (EA) website HERE).
• Report any unusual-looking shrimps to the EA straight away
• Remember that this shrimp has the ability to spread very quickly, so –
- Clean and dry tackle thoroughly before each fishing trip
- Raise awareness among other users of lakes and watercourses to alert them to the danger.


S&TA CEO, Paul Knight declares: “Vigilance and care must be every angler’s bywords to help stamp out this dangerous predator. The speed of spread is frightening, and we must do everything possible to contain it. Please just take an extra minute or two to make sure you are not inadvertently transporting shrimps from one water to another, and always be on the lookout for shrimps you don’t recognise. It was anglers, after all, who first alerted the country to this invasion.”

Angling Trust CEO, Mark Lloyd said: “The future of the £3.5 billion angling industry is at stake, along with the beloved pastime of millions of anglers and the country’s aquatic biodiversity. We must all take rigorous steps to ensure that this pest is not allowed to spread any further and wreak havoc on the nation’s water environment. This little shrimp has the potential to do far more damage to fisheries than signal crayfish and other invasive species.”


ENDS
Issued on behalf of the Salmon & Trout Association and the Angling Trust
www.salmon-trout.org
www.anglingtrust.net
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Dec 03, 2010 12:15 pm

.



Here's a link to the Freswater Biological Association, to help you indentify the shrimp;

Identification of the "Killer Shrimp"


Richard
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Dec 17, 2010 11:20 pm

Environment Agency Wales has confirmed that an invasive species of predatory shrimp is inhabiting waters at various locations across south Wales.

Dikerogammarus villosus, dubbed the killer shrimp by biologists for its appetite for native species like shrimp, young fish and insect larvae, can alter the ecology of the habitats it invades.

It has been confirmed at Cardiff Bay and Eglwys Nunydd Reservoir in Port Talbot. The non-native species was found by Cardiff Harbour Authority as part of their Environmental Monitoring programme and later confirmed by Environment Agency Wales at Eglwys Nunydd.

Originally from the steppe region between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea it is believed to have invaded Western Europe via the Danube / Rhine Canal. The only other confirmed sighting in the UK is at Grafham Water Reservoir in Cambridgeshire in September this year. It is not yet known how the species arrived in the waters of south Wales.

The Welsh Assembly Government has set up an all Wales group to address the situation, and includes Environment Agency Wales, the Countryside Council for Wales, Cardiff Harbour Authority and the owners of Eglwys Nunydd. The Group is working collaboratively to monitor and contain the species as much as possible.

The advice from the Group is that anyone who uses these waters must take steps to prevent the species from spreading. Simple things like cleaning and drying equipment thoroughly after use and checking equipment when leaving the water are vital.

Further advice for water users in Cardiff Bay can be found at www.cardiffharbour.com.

Chris Mills, Director, Environment Agency Wales, said:

“Despite the fearsome name, these are not a threat to people, but the damage they can cause to our environment here in Wales is a very real danger.

“Because of what they eat and the rate that they eat it, it can alter the food chain and our ecosystem by increasing the competition for food and the native species that rely on the insects could go elsewhere.

“We will continue with our monitoring work across Wales to identify any other water recreation spots where they could be to see how widespread the problem has become.”
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Thu Mar 03, 2011 2:34 am

Press release from United Utlities

We tackle 'killer' shrimp

25 February 2011


A "killer" shrimp has invaded UK waters and is feeding on native fish and insect larvae, we are warning.

Dubbed the "killer shrimp" by biologists for its appetite, it often kills its prey and leaves it uneaten.

The predator also alters the ecology of habitats it invades.

We are working with the Angling Trust and Environment Agency to prevent the spread of the crustacean to North West waters.

A craze sweeping the UK, has seen anglers use "floating tubes" - large inflatable tyres - to fish on water.

The tubes, which are easily transported are thought to help the species spread by transferring eggs between rivers and other watercourses such as reservoirs.

We have confirmed we are banning the use of floating tubes at all its recreational reservoirs across the North West.

Safety concerns where raised about the tube users going near inlet values in reservoirs and other moving equipment.

Originally from a region between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, the shrimp has spread across most of Western Europe in the past 10 years.

They can be as small as 3mm but may grow up to 30mm long, making it much larger than native freshwater shrimp.

Bryan Homan, water catchment operations manager, said: "Despite their fearsome name, the shrimp are not a threat to people, but the damage they could cause to our environment here in the North West is very real.

"Because of what they eat and the rate that they eat it, the shrimp can alter the food chain and our ecosystem, threatening native species."

He added: "To prevent the shrimp from entering our recreational reservoirs, we are today confirming the ban on the use of floating tubes.

"We're also encouraging all visitors to our reservoirs, whether for fishing or boating, to help us prevent the spread of the shrimp, by washing down all equipment before and after use."

The shrimp was found in the UK at a reservoir in Cambridgeshire last September.

Environment Agency Wales confirmed last year it was found at Cardiff Bay and Eglwys Nunydd Reservoir in Port Talbot.

It is believed the shrimp arrived in the UK from Eastern Europe on the hulls of ships.

Mark Owen from the UK's Angling Trust said, "The spread of Dikerogammarus would be a disaster for angling and fisheries at a national scale. We are working closely with United Utilities to find watertight biosecurity measures which allow angling to continue along with all other water pursuits.

"We will be exploring ways in which float tubes might be allowed to be used safely in the future."
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Apr 15, 2011 8:54 pm

Invasive Shrimp, Dikerogammarus villosus.
Briefing Note 3, 15th March 2011.

Introduction


The invasive non native shrimp, Dikerogammarus villosus („killer shrimp‟),was first
reported in the UK on 3rd September in Grafham Water SSSI in Cambridgeshire,
and was subsequently found on 25th November in Cardiff Bay, and on 26th
November in Eglwys Nunydd reservoir (Port Talbot), in South Wales. Briefing notes
1 and 2 (11th October 2010; 22nd December 2010) provided information on the
response to these discoveries. Both available at:
www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/killershrimp

This briefing note provides a further update on developments.
D. villosus is an aggressive predator with a high rate of reproduction. It is an
extremely successful invasive species with the potential to spread quickly and to
cause harm to freshwater ecosystems. We predict that if it becomes widespread it
will threaten a number of native species through predation and competition and will
have knock-on effects for biodiversity and the wider functioning of freshwater
ecosystems in the UK.

The shrimp has already colonised parts of Western Europe, killing and outcompeting
a range of aquatic species such as freshwater invertebrates, particularly
native freshwater shrimps and even very young fish. It therefore can alter the
ecology of the habitats it invades.

The potential impact of the invasive shrimp

D. villosus is thought to be one of the most damaging invasive species in Europe.
The UK Technical Advisory Group for the Water Framework Directive (UKTAG) has
included it on their list of high impact species and it is amongst the „Top 100‟ invasive
alien species in Europe ( www.europe-aliens.org ). It has the potential to
significantly affect the ecology of our major rivers, canals and lakes as well as some
brackish habitats.

D. villosus has spread rapidly across Europe following the opening of the Rhine-
Main-Danube canal in 1992. This links its home waters (the region of the Caspian
and Black Seas) to Western Europe, so the shrimp is now found in many countries
including the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and France.

Context to the response


The Non-native Species Secretariat has responsibility for helping to coordinate the overall approach to invasive non-native species issues in Great Britain. The Secretariat reports to the GB Non-native Species Programme Board which represents the relevant governments and agencies of England, Scotland and Wales. The approach to invasive non-native species is summarised in the Invasive Non-native Species Framework Strategy for Great Britain, which is intended to provide a strategic framework within which the actions of government departments, their related bodies and key stakeholders can be better co-ordinated. More information on the Non-native Species Secretariat can be found at: www.nonnativespecies.org

Given the potential impacts of D. villosus and the significant challenges we face in dealing with events as they develop, we need to keep current actions under review. Our current priorities are: contain it at known affected sites; investigate whether it is present elsewhere; identify and commission investigations and research on key aspects of its impact and effectiveness of biosecurity measures; and promote behaviour that will reduce the risks of spreading it from one place to another. We will be reviewing the effectives of current measures and advising Defra and WAG on current policy aims.

Managing the response


The response to this species in England and Wales is being led by a National Task Group comprising staff from Defra, WAG and expert advisers from the Environment Agency, Natural England and the Countryside Council for Wales. The Task Group is coordinating delivery of the response plan and key high level actions. There are several workstreams aimed at addressing the main issues and progress will be reported to the GB Non Native Species Programme Board.
Developments since Briefing note #2

Containment: site managers and users of the three known affected sites are continuing to implement bio-security good practice in recognition of the critical importance of preventing any spread from these sites. Basic bio-security advice is available at the GB Non Native Species Secretariat‟s website: www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/killershrimp

Pilot studies were conducted in late January-early February in an unheated outbuilding. It was found that the shrimps could survive for up to 15 days on wet, folded waders and for up to 7 days on a folded, damp net. Therefore it remains vitally important that all equipment is thoroughly checked, washed and dried to avoid risk of introducing the shrimp to another water body. These measures are essential if we are to preserve as many options as possible for control measures in due course and the cooperation of all involved is greatly appreciated.

Surveillance and monitoring: no new discoveries have been made beyond the three known affected sites during winter surveillance. The Environment Agency is planning to deploy specially adapted traps in the coming months to enhance our ability to investigate whether the shrimp is present at any other sites.

See the Environment Agency press release of 3rd March at: http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/news/127915.aspx

Nature conservation sites: Natural England and the Countryside Council for Wales are leading work to identify high risk nature conservation sites and planning work to implement relevant bio-security at those sites. This work is being done in liaison with the Environment Agency so that surveillance and monitoring effort is undertaken as strategically as possible. The nature conservation agencies are considering how best to involve the cooperation and assistance of stakeholders in planning this work and will be seeking their views shortly. For further information on this work please contact Genevieve Madgwick at Natural England: genevieve.madgwick@naturalengland.org.uk

Research: a scientific and technical advice group comprised of a range of experts is helping to identify and prioritise research needs. Research is being commissioned by Defra to investigate whether there are disinfectants suitable for practical use as part of the bio-security (decontamination) practices that would enhance their effectiveness by killing any shrimps present on equipment etc and further reducing any risks of translocation.

A Cambridge University led research programme, supported by the University of Leeds and Queen‟s University, Belfast, is underway, investigating the implications for biodiversity of invasion by D.villosus. This study includes: whether the predatory impact and prey range as observed in Europe is similar in the UK; whether the shrimp may be carrying parasites or is affected by parasites in the UK; the factors affecting its potential spread. Joint funders of this work include the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation.

Communications: a wide range of bodies have already been raising awareness of this issue amongst their memberships and this is greatly welcomed. Key personnel from within Government and its agencies as well as representatives of relevant landowners, water user groups and conservation interests are now coordinating efforts to improve the flow of information and advice to those who need to know.

A communications group has been established to coordinate communications activities across the relevant Government departments and agencies as well as other stakeholders and partners. A number of recreational bodies, environmental NGOs and other relevant/interested organisations are represented on this group, which also provides a forum for a broader exchange on issues and concerns about the species and the response measures being taken. If you wish to learn more about this group please contact: emma.kiddle@defra.gsi.gov.uk or caroline.deville@defra.gsi.gov.uk
An awareness campaign is being developed in conjunction with this wide range of stakeholders to reinforce some of the existing bio-security messages that many of these groups are already promoting. A unifying campaign „brand‟ has been developed to highlight the “Check – Clean – Dry” bio-security best practice message, along with a branded campaign collateral for stakeholders to use if they do not have their own. A campaign website is also being developed.

What can your organisation do?

Bio-security advice is available from the central information point for the invasive shrimp at the GB Non Native Species Secretariat website: www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/killershrimp
This includes information on shrimp identification and interim bio-security guidance for anglers and boaters. Keep up to date with this website as it will be periodically updated as new information and guidance becomes available.

It is important that anyone monitoring or surveying freshwaters is vigilant and reports suspected sightings of the shrimp via the NNSS website. You should be particularly vigilant at water bodies with stony or artificial substrate, and those containing zebra mussels. Where D.villosus has been detected the bio-security advice for boating and angling should be applied to any equipment that has been in contact with the water.

It is always good practice to inspect, clean thoroughly and dry any equipment which has been in contact with the freshwater environment to minimise the risk of spreading non-native species. For D.villosus bio-security advice, please refer to the link above.

Further information

If you have any queries or would like further information about the shrimp and the actions taken to control its spread, or if you feel your organisation can help, please visit: www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/killershrimp

You can contact the GB Secretariat at the above address or alternatively you can contact Mark Diamond of the Environment Agency at: mark.diamond@environment-agency.gov.uk
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:30 am

I reckon these things are coming from the kits you can bye, ie, sea monkeys, Triops, kids get bored with them and pore them down the sink, there are some nasty looking things in these kits, I know I had some years ago
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:55 am

Fortunately not!

Sea Monkeys are Artemia salina, brine shrimp, closely related to Triops, 100m years old, but they need salt water and die after about an hour in fresh water.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemia_salina

Tripos are an ancient (300m years old) species of shrimp, the species found in the UK Triops cancriformis is endangered.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triops

If these Dikerogammarus villosus things can live for 15 days on wet tackle I can see disinfecting at commercials becoming the norm, maybe something will have to be done at rivers but how?
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:26 pm

Yorkshire’s waters surveyed for killer shrimp

02-Aug-2011

Environment Agency officers are on the hunt for the so-called killer shrimp to check whether it has invaded this far north.

While it’s unlikely the shrimp has colonised Yorkshire’s waters, the team at the Environment Agency will be setting special traps at selected lakes.

Monitoring programme
Environment Agency team leader Paul Curry said: “These surveys form part of a national monitoring programme to assess the spread of the killer shrimp. Whilst we are optimistic the shrimp hasn’t come this far north, we have targeted the surveys at the waters we think most likely to contain them if they have.

“We’ll be setting the traps over the next couple of months as we do other work in each of the target areas.”

The shrimp was first spotted in the UK last year in Cambridgeshire and sparked a nationwide alert. They are thought to be transported on angler’s nets, by boats or by fish stocking.

Paul continues, “We’d encourage all anglers, wherever they are fishing, to check, clean and dry their tackle, as that will help stop the spread of invasive species and disease.”

Predator
The shrimp is a voracious predator (hence its common name of ‘killer shrimp’). It kills a range of native species, such as freshwater invertebrates, particularly native shrimps and even young fish. This alters the ecology of the habitats it invades. It often kills its prey and leaves it uneaten. It tends to dominate the habitat, sometimes causing the extinction of native species.

Insects such as damselflies and water boatmen, common sights on British lakes and rivers, could be at risk, with knock-on effects on the species which feed on them.

It has spread across most of Western Europe over the last 10 years. It can be as small as 3mm but may grow up to 30mm long, much larger than our native freshwater shrimp.

To report a suspected sighting of killer shrimp email alert_nonnative@ceh.ac.uk

Ends

Notes to editors
Dikerogammarus villosus is an invasive non-native shrimp that has spread from the Ponto-Caspian Region of Eastern Europe. It is believed to have invaded Western Europe via the Danube. It has spread across most of Western Europe over the last 10 years. It grows up to 30mm long, much larger than our native freshwater shrimp. It often has striped or spotted markings.

The surveys will be carried out at:

Scaling Dam Reservoir, nr Whitby
Grinwith Reservoir, nr Pately Bridge
River Ouse at Naburn
Farnham Lake, Knaresborough
Wintersett, nr Pontefract
River Derwent
Hornsea Mere
Yeadon Tarn
Swinsty Reservoir, near Ilkley
Fewston Reservoir, near Ilkley
Rother Valley Country Park lake, Rotherham
Ulley Reservoir, nr Rotherham
Pugneys Country Park, Wakefield

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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:24 pm

is this a killer shrimp



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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Jun 13, 2014 2:21 pm

hi keith
found this picture about the killer shrimp but without a close picture of the one you posted it looks very like the killer shrimp....

http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/469687/Killer-shrimp-invade-British-rivers-by-CANOE
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:19 pm

Where did you find the shrimp Keith...Thames, Bourne?
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:38 pm

eel trap Steve
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Jun 14, 2014 12:38 am

Yikes... need to find something that will eat them... do they fry up well?

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Keith Collett

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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Jun 14, 2014 7:18 am

Ed Randall wrote:
Yikes... need to find something that will eat them... do they fry up well?

need around 500 of them to make a good sandwich, with a dap of English mustud on
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Jun 14, 2014 8:51 am

Keith Collett wrote:
eel trap Steve
Eel trap Molesey or Crazy crayfish (eel) trap Bourne?

I think it definitely needs reporting to the EA pale
If you get any more, try to do a close-up photo with the flash turned off,
and a ruler in the photo as well.

Edit: found a recipe:
http://www.esquire.com/blogs/food-for-men/uk-killer-shrimp-recipe-091410

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Last edited by Ed Randall on Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:33 pm; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: Killer Shrimps   Sat Jun 14, 2014 8:55 pm

Have to say I agree certainly looks like it, and they are bigger than the normal gammarus we find.

Yes report it in but here alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
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