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 Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt

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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 1:55 pm

The UK is set to be amongst the best prepared nations for the implications of climate change following publication of a groundbreaking study into the threats the country faces.

TheClimate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) highlights the top 100 challenges to the UK and our economy of a changing climate and provides the most compelling evidence yet of the need to increase our resilience. The research confirms the UK as a world-leader in understanding climate risk to ensure we can make robust plans to deal with these threats.

In order to provide a reliable baseline for decisions by Government, local authorities and businesses the research does not take into account any future policies or plans. However, a Government report published alongside the CCRA does highlight the many current and future policies already in place and gives details of plans which will address some of the risks identified.

The Government has also today announced a National Adaptation Programme that will prepare the UK for the effects of climate change, including the risks set out in the CCRA. People are encouraged to give their views through a new website on the action needed to tackle the implications of climate change where they live and work.

Speaking at the launch of the CCRA, Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman said:

“This world class research provides the most comprehensive case yet on why we need to take action to adapt the UK and our economy to the impacts of climate change. It shows what life could be like if we stopped our preparations now, and the consequences such a decision would mean for our economic stability.

“The Climate Change Risk Assessment will be vital in helping us to understand what we need to do to stop these threats becoming a reality. In doing so there is also great potential for growth through UK firms developing innovative products and services tailored to meet the global climate challenges.”

Professor Sir Bob Watson, Chief Scientific Adviser at Defra, said:

“The CCRA is ground-breaking research which puts the UK at the forefront of understanding what the projected changes to our climate will really mean for us.

“For the first time it means we can compare a wide range of risks based on their financial, social and environmental implications. This will be invaluable for Government in prioritising the areas for future policies and investment, and it will help businesses assess what they need to do to ensure they are resilient to the changing climate.”

Lord John Krebs, Chair of the Adaptation Sub-Committee of the Committee on Climate Change, said:

“Without an effective plan to prepare for the risks from climate change the country may sleepwalk into disaster. This report represents an important first step in the process and demonstrates why the UK needs to take action to adapt now. The work of my Committee has found that by taking steps to manage these risks, the UK can reduce the costs of climate change in the future.

“The Government’s forthcoming adaptation programme should tackle barriers to adaptation so that local communities, businesses and households can take action to prepare.”

Among the key risks the CCRA identifies, in the unlikely event the UK took no further action, are:

• Hotter summers present significant health risks. The CCRA projects that without measures to reduce the risk, there could be between 580-5,900 additional premature deaths per year by the 2050s. The Department for Health launched a Heatwave Plan in 2004 and update it annually to provide advice and support for people vulnerable to hotter weather.

• Increasing pressure on the UK’s water resources. The CCRA projects that without action to improve water resources, there could be major supply shortages by the 2050s in parts of the north, south and east of England with the greatest challenge in the Thames River basin. Defra published a Water White Paper last year which includes a package of measures to address water supply shortages, and to ensure the water industry is more resilient to future challenges.

• The risks of flooding are projected to increase significantly across the UK. New analysis for England and Wales show that if no further plans were made to adapt to changing flood risks, by the 2080s due the effects of climate change and population growth annual damages to buildings and property could reach between £2.1billion – £12billion, compared to current costs of £1.2billion. Defra has introduced a new method of allocating funding for flood defences so that more communities will benefit from flood protection, and the Department is working with the ABI to ensure that flood insurance remains widely available after the current agreement between Government and insurers expires in 2013. As part of these discussions, Defra is considering whether there are feasible, value for money ways of targeting funding support to those at highest flood risk and less able to pay.

• The number of days in an average year when temperatures rise above 26 degrees C is projected to rise from 18 days to between 27-121 days in London by the 2080s. This could mean greater demand for energy to cool buildings and more heat related illnesses.

• Increases in drought and some pest and diseases could reduce timber yields and quality. Projected drought conditions could mean a drop in timber yields of between 10% and 25% by the 2080s in the south east, driving up timber costs. Pests and diseases, which thrive in warmer conditions, may also pose an increasing threat, such as red band needle blight – which causes loss of foliage and can lead to tree death. Defra has published a Tree and Plant Health Action Plan and committed £7million to further research into plant diseases.

The CCRA also highlights opportunities for the UK that climate change could present, including:

• Opening of Arctic shipping routes. The melting of Arctic sea ice could lead to the opening up of new container shipping routes and improved trade links with Asia and the Pacific.

• Milder winters may result in a major reduction in cold-related deaths and illnesses. Currently, cold weather results in between 26,000 and 57,000 premature deaths each year in the UK. By the 2050s, a reduction in these figures of between 3,900 and 24,000 is projected to occur due to increasing average winter temperatures. This would particularly benefit vulnerable groups, including those with existing health problems.

• Opportunities to improve sustainable food production. Sugar beet yields are projected to increase by 20-70% and wheat yields by 40-140% by the 2050s due to longer growing seasons if water and nutrients remain available. A warmer climate presents opportunities to grow new crops such as soya, sunflowers, peaches, apricots and grapes, while new markets may open up overseas for British grown produce.

The CCRA evidence will be used to develop a National Adaptation Programme (NAP) that will set out timescales for the actions Government will take to meet the challenges of climate change.

The development of the NAP starts today and Caroline Spelman has called on the public to give their views on what the priorities areas for action should be. These views will help shape the final NAP, which will be published in 2013.

Mrs Spelman continued:

“Climate change is a global phenomenon, but its impacts will be felt at a local level and affect people differently depending on where they live. That is why I want people to give us their views to help develop a National Adaption Programme that puts us in the best shape possible to meet climate change head on.”

Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA)

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David Harvey

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PostSubject: Re: Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 1:59 pm

Not much to read then Shocked
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PostSubject: climate change risk assessment shows uk needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 3:13 pm

You would think they would be more worried about getting people back into work than worrying about whether its going to rain in a hundred years time.
Still, i could print it out and save on the Andrex.
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James Mitchell

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PostSubject: Re: Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 3:55 pm

James Annear wrote:
You would think they would be more worried about getting people back into work than worrying about whether its going to rain in a hundred years time.
Still, i could print it out and save on the Andrex.

Government has to balance risks and demands against each other.

You could equally say that you would think they'd be more worried about lowering unemployment or reducing NHS waiting lists than helping stock rivers so that some blokes can pull them out a couple of times a week!

Anyway, I suspect we'll be seeing some more dramatic effects than a bit of rain sooner than 100 years...
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PostSubject: Re: Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 4:05 pm

It amazes me that in one paragraph they're warning of the 'Increasing pressure on the UK’s water resources', and in the next they're worried about the risks of flooding........

If they'd spent the last 50 years building new reservoirs, investing in a national water network and concentrating on getting the flood water into the reservoirs - instead of shifting it into the sea in the shortest possible time, we would have fewer problems now and little to worry about in the future.

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PostSubject: climate change risk assessment shows uk needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 4:21 pm

James,
Those blokes you talk about, pulling fish out a couple of times a week, actually pay for the rivers to be stocked via the licence fee.
The only balance this government is interested in, is their "Bank balances"
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PostSubject: Re: Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 4:44 pm

James Annear wrote:
James,
Those blokes you talk about, pulling fish out a couple of times a week, actually pay for the rivers to be stocked via the licence fee.
The only balance this government is interested in, is their "Bank balances"

Not really, EA spending report show licences raise about £20m in revenue, of which £7m is spent on licence checking and "promotion." So £13m of licence revenue goes on improvements. The taxpayer funds the rest of the restocking and fisheries improvements - ajust over £14m - so non anglers pay more than anglers for fisheries improvements ("blokes catching fish").

Might be a bad analogy anyway, but the point is the government can't just divert all of its income into what is seen as the one top priority. Otherwise, why would they subsidise a library when someone is dying from cancer?

The cost to the country of researching and preparing for the effects of climate change will eventually be far outweighed by the cost of doing nothing. So I reckon this is a rare example of where the Government are actually being responsible.

Having said that, as Barry says, its a ricidulous position where we're worried about decreasing water resources and increased flooding. Someone needs to pull their finger out.
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James Annear



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PostSubject: climate change risk assessment shows uk needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 5:40 pm

James.
You say non anglers pay more than anglers for fishery improvements, sorry but i take that as an insult to the guys who turned up at Penton Hook and at several other work parties who get their hands dirty, its volunteers who improve fisheries, not people quoting dodgy figures.
Hope too see at the Hogsmill.
James
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James Mitchell

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PostSubject: Re: Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt   Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:55 pm

James Annear wrote:
James.
You say non anglers pay more than anglers for fishery improvements, sorry but i take that as an insult to the guys who turned up at Penton Hook and at several other work parties who get their hands dirty, its volunteers who improve fisheries, not people quoting dodgy figures.
Hope too see at the Hogsmill.
James

Not sure how that could be interpreted as an insult to volunteers in any way mate. Looks like everyone involved did a bloody good job to me.

Just pointing out that the government (I.e taxpayers) also subsidise angling, when they could be spending the money on other stuff. That's a good thing in my opinion, we should be pressuring them to do more of it, as well as getting involved ourselves where possible. Mitigating the effects of a changing climate is part of it, albeit on a longer time scale. Should give them credit where it's due.

P.s, hope the figures aren't dodgy, got them from the EA website! Wink
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